There’s plenty at stake nationally and locally as Angelina County voters go to the polls starting today for early voting on party nominations for national races as well as several statewide and local races.

Early voting for the March party primaries begins today at 8 a.m. at the Angelina County Annex, 606 E. Lufkin Ave. in Lufkin.

The primary election will determine which candidates will appear on the ballot as the nominees from the Republican and Democrat parties in the November general election. Texas voters may vote in either the Republican or Democratic primaries, but not both.

Residents can check to see if they are already registered to vote through the Texas Secretary of State’s website at teamrv-mvp.sos.texas.gov/MVP/mvp.do or by visiting votetexas.gov.

Here’s what’s on the ballots:

REPUBLICANS

Following is a listing of Republican candidates for all races and non-binding propositions. Sample ballots for your specific voting precinct are available at the elections office at the Angelina County Courthouse Annex in Lufkin or online at angelinacounty.net/elections/.

United States Senator

Geraldine Sam

Mary Miller

Stefano de Stefano

Ted Cruz

Bruce Jacobson, Jr.

United States Representative, District 1

Roshin Rowjee

Louie Gohmert

Anthony Culler

Governor

Greg Abbott

SECEDE Kilgore

Barbara Krueger

Lieutenant Governor

Dan Patrick

Scott Milder

Attorney General

Ken Paxton

Comptroller of Public Accounts

Glenn Hegar

Commissioner of the General Land Office

Rick Range

Davey Edwards

George P. Bush

Jerry Patterson

Commissioner of Agriculture

Jim Hogan

Sid Miller

Trey Blocker

Railroad Commissioner

Christi Craddick

Weston Martinez

Justice, Supreme Court, Place 2

Jimmy Blacklock

Justice, Supreme Court, Place 4

John Devine

Justice, Supreme Court, Place 6

Jeff Brown

Presiding Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals

David Bridges

Sharon Keller

Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 7

Barbara Parker Hervey

Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 8

Dib Waldrip

Michelle Slaughter

Jay Brandon

State Senator, District 3

Robert Nichols

State Representative, District 57

Trent Ashby

Justice, 12th Court of Appeals District, Place 3

Greg Neeley

District Judge, 159th Judicial District

Paul E. White

District Judge, 217th Judicial District

Robert “Bob” Inselmann

County Judge

Don Lymbery

Wes Suiter

Judge, County Court at Law No. 1

Joe Lee Register

Judge, County Court at Law No. 2

Clyde M. Herrington

District Clerk

Reba Ellison Squyres

County Clerk

Amy Fincher

County Treasurer

Rebecca Davis

Jill Brewer

County Commissioner, Precinct No. 4

Bobby Cheshire

Scott Cooper

Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 1

Billy S. Ball

Robert Kyle Marshall

Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 2

Donnie G. Puckett

Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 3

Pat Grimes Grubbs

Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 4

Aaron Smith

Rodney Cheshire

County Chairman

Donald Baum

Ballot Propositions

Proposition 1

Texas should replace the property tax system with an appropriate consumption tax equivalent.

Proposition 2

No governmental entity should ever construct or fund construction of toll roads without voter approval.

Proposition 3

Republicans in the Texas House should select their Speaker nominee by secret ballot in a binding caucus without Democrat influence.

Proposition 4

Texas should require employers to screen new hires through the free E-Verify system to protect jobs for legal workers.

Proposition 5

Texas families should be empowered to choose from public, private, charter or homeschool options for their children’s education, using tax credits or exemptions without government constraints or intrusion.

Proposition 6

Texas should protect the privacy and safety of women and children in spaces such as bathrooms, locker rooms and showers in all Texas schools and government buildings.

Proposition 7

I believe abortion should be abolished in Texas.

Proposition 8

Vote fraud should be a felony in Texas to help ensure fair elections.

Proposition 9

Texas demands that Congress completely repeal Obamacare.

Proposition 10

To slow the growth of property taxes, yearly revenue increases should be capped at 4%, with increases in excess of 4% requiring voter approval.

Proposition 11

Tax dollars should not be used to fund the building of stadiums for professional or semi-professional sports teams.

DEMOCRATS

Following is a listing of Democratic candidates for all races and non-binding propositions. Sample ballots for your specific voting precinct are available at the elections office at the Angelina County Courthouse Annex in Lufkin or online at angelinacounty.net/elections.

United States Senator

Beto O’Rourke

Sema Hernandez

Edward Kimbrough

United States Representative, District 1

Brent Beal

Shirley J. McKellar

Governor

Cedric Davis, Sr.

Adrian Ocegueda

Grady Yarbrough

Jeffrey Payne

Joe Mumbach

Andrew White

James Jolly Clark

Tom Wakely

Lupe Valdez

Lieutenant Governor

Michael Cooper

Mike Collier

Attorney General

Justin Nelson

Comptroller of Public Accounts

Joi Chevalier

Tim Mahoney

Commissioner of the General Land Office

Miguel Suazo

Tex Morgan

Commissioner of Agriculture

Kim Olson

Railroad Commissioner

Chris Spellmon

Roman McAllen

Justice, Supreme Court, Place 2

Steven Kirkland

Justice, Supreme Court, Place 4

R.K. Sandill

Justice, Supreme Court, Place 6

Kathy Cheng

Presiding Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals

Maria T. (Terri) Jackson

Judge, Court of Criminal Appeals, Place 7

Ramona Franklin

State Senator, District 3

Shirley Layton

State Representative, District 57

Jason Rogers

County Commissioner, Precinct No. 2

Kermit A. Kennedy

David Stua

Justice of the Peace, Precinct No. 2

Justin Mosley

County Chairman

Angelia Cordova

Ballot Propositions

Proposition 1

Right to a 21st Century Public Education: Should everyone in Texas have the right to quality public education from pre-k to 12th grade, and affordable college and career training without the burden of crushing student loan debt?

Proposition 2

Student Loan Debt: Should everyone in Texas have the right to refinance student loan debt with the Federal Reserve at a 0% interest rate, as relief for the crushing burden of debt and an investment in the next generation of Americans?

Proposition 3

Right to Healthcare: Should everyone in Texas have a right to healthcare, guaranteed by a universal, quality Medicare-for-all system?

Proposition 4

Right to Economic Security: Should everyone in Texas have the right to economic security, where all workers have earned paid family and sick leave and a living wage that respects their hard work?

Proposition 5

National Jobs Program: Should the Democratic Party promote a national jobs program, with high wage and labor standards, to replace crumbling infrastructure and rebuild hurricane damaged areas, paid for with local, state, and federal bonds financed through the Federal Reserve at low interest with long term maturities?

Proposition 6

Right to Clean Air, Safe Water, and a Healthy Environment: Should everyone in Texas have the right to clean air, safe water and a healthy environment?

Proposition 7

Right to Dignity & Respect: Should everyone in Texas have the right to a life of dignity and respect, free from discrimination and harassment anywhere, including businesses and public facilities, no matter how they identify, the color of their skin, who they love, socioeconomic status, or from where they come?

Proposition 8

Right to Housing: Should everyone in Texas have the right to affordable and accessible housing and modern utilities including high speed internet, free from any form of discrimination?

Proposition 9

Right to Vote: Should every eligible Texan have the right to vote, made easier by automatic voter registration, the option to vote by mail, a state election holiday and no corporate campaign influence, foreign interference or illegal gerrymandering?

Proposition 10

Right to a Fair Criminal Justice System: Should everyone in Texas have the right to a fair criminal justice system that treats people equally and puts an end to the mass incarceration of young people of color for minor offenses?

Proposition 11

Immigrant Rights: Should there be a just and fair comprehensive immigration reform solution that includes an earned path to citizenship for law-abiding immigrants and their children, keeps families together, protects DREAMers and provides workforce solutions for businesses?

Proposition 12

Right to Fair Taxation: Should everyone in Texas have the right to a fair tax system, where all interests (business, corporations, and individuals) pay their share, so that state government meets its obligations?

Texas voters should possess one of the seven approved forms of photo ID that they must present that ID at the polls. Voters who do not possess and cannot reasonably obtain one of the seven forms of approved photo ID may execute a Reasonable Impediment Declaration form, available to them at each polling location, and provide a supporting form of identification.

In addition, certain voters may qualify for certain exemptions to presenting an acceptable form of photo identification or following the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure.

The seven forms of approved photo ID are:

■ Texas Driver License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)

■ Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS

■ Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS

■ Texas Handgun License issued by DPS

■ United States Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph

■ United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph

■ United States Passport (book or card)

With the exception of the U.S. Citizenship Certificate, which does not expire, the acceptable photo ID must be current or, for voters aged 18-69, have expired no more than four years before being presented for voter qualification at the polling place. A voter 70 years of age or older may use a form of acceptable photo ID listed above that has expired for any length of time if the identification is otherwise valid.

If a voter does not possess one of the forms of acceptable photo identification listed above, and the voter cannot reasonably obtain such identification, the voter may fill out a Reasonable Impediment Declaration form, which will be available at each polling location, and present a copy or original of one of the following supporting forms of identification:

■ a government document that shows the voter’s name and an address, including the voter’s voter registration certificate

■ a current utility bill

■ a bank statement

■ a government check

■ a paycheck

■ a certified domestic (from a U.S. state or territory) birth certificate

■ a document confirming birth admissible in a court of law which establishes the voter’s identity (which may include a foreign birth document)

The address on an acceptable form of photo identification or a supporting form of identification, if applicable, does not have to match the voter’s address on the list of registered voters.

If a voter meets these requirements and is otherwise eligible to vote, the voter will be able to cast a regular ballot in the election.

Voters with a disability may apply with the county voter registrar for a permanent exemption to presenting an acceptable form of photo identification or following the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure at the polls. Voters with a religious objection to being photographed or voters who do not present an acceptable form of photo identification or follow the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure at the polls because of certain natural disasters may apply for a temporary exemption to presenting an acceptable form of photo identification or following the Reasonable Impediment Declaration procedure.

For more details, voters may contact the Angelina County voter registrar at 634-8376, ext. 4.

Voters with questions about how to cast a ballot in upcoming elections can call 1-(800)-252-VOTE

For more information on voting in Texas, visit votetexas.gov.

Steve Knight’s email address is sknight@lufkindailynews.com.