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As we head into an unprecedented school year, I wanted to take this time to thank our teachers and school district staff and leaders. Your job wasn’t an easy one before, and it certainly isn’t now with all the extra things to be concerned with and the new precautions that will have to be taken.

In the aftermath of the Nazi atrocities to the Jews, Martin Niemoller (a Lutheran pastor who had been imprisoned by Hitler from 1938 to 1945 for defending the church) expressed his regret for not doing more. He wrote a poem that expresses my grave concern about being silent.

As a physician, I have been fascinated by the rapid acquisition of knowledge about the novel coronavirus and the deadly disease it causes, COVID-19. True, that knowledge may not be coming as fast as we like. But the pace of vaccine development, for example, is remarkable. But along with know…

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Honestly, at this point I’m kinda sorta wishing I’d had my high school math and science teachers sign one of those fancy non-disclosure agreements all those years ago. I sure wouldn’t want the public to see my feeble grades on those transcripts.

When a COVID-19 vaccine becomes available, there will be a race to ensure it is widely administered and Americans are protected. Whether that happens in six or 18 months from now, one way we can ensure rapid adoption of the vaccine is by ensuring that pharmacists like me are equipped and aut…

Avid cattleman readers will remember an article earlier this year, where I discussed Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association’s involvement in judicial issues. The case I highlighted in the story was Hlavinka et al. v. HSC Pipeline Partnership, LLC, which pitted a Texas rancher agai…

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For the American Legion Family, a new year started on July 1. Normally it is convention time, election of new officers for posts and units as well as districts, divisions, state and national. On almost all levels, officers were asked to stay on another year because conventions on all levels …

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I want to start this column by encouraging you to join me in praying for our fellow Texans who were recently affected by Hurricane Hanna.

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Within the African American family, this past week has been a reminder for me that nothing is permanent — all things except God are temporary.

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Batman had Robin and Alfred. Spider-Man had Andy Maguire and Ned Leeds (and Uncle Ben before he kept dying in every new version). Captain America had Bucky Barnes. Iron Man had Rhodey Rhodes. Superman had Jimmy Olsen and Lois Lane.

One hundred thirty-six days. That is how long residents of nursing homes and assisted living communities have been separated from their family and friends.

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I recently read an article published in Time magazine that claimed Americans are the most unhappy they have been in 50 years.

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It was nearly two months ago that Linda Parker, state Rep. Trent Ashby’s administrative assistant, called and asked our city to look at some way to assist the small businesses in our city. These businesses were hit hard with Stay Home Stay Safe requests, which resulted in a decrease in their…

At TxDOT, things change daily. Whether it’s road maintenance, an ongoing construction project or someone asking me a question I have never answered before. I guess that’s why I enjoy my job so much. Each day is different and the people who work around me feel the same way.

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We are now living in a new world. Wearing masks at work and while grocery shopping. No more handshakes, just a wave from six feet away. Putting on make up and fixing your hair, yet staying in your pajamas for a Zoom meeting. Drive-thru doctor visits and testing.

Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery,” published in 1948, has always been one of my favorite short stories. When I was younger, my love of the story had more to do with the twisted ending. I loved that kind of stuff. As I grew older, I began learning of the various themes. Now, as an educator, I l…

We have been dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic for many months now. What an emotional roller coaster ride it has been. Early thoughts of “flattening the curve” have not panned out in Texas.

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There have been a lot of valuable lessons and reminders from the COVID-19 pandemic. Chief among these is the simple fact that urban and suburban America cannot survive without rural America.

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